The Pensacola Police Shield

The Pensacola Police Department has one of the most unique and attractive shields in existence. Officers, badge collectors and historians worldwide have attempted to purchase them. However, they are not for sale. The only way to possess one legally is to become a Pensacola Police officer and earn the right to wear one. Here is a summary of the symbolism found in this great shield.

City Seal: The seal of the City of Pensacola is in the center of the shield. This is a unique but symbolic item. The first thing one notices is the round circle, the five different dates, the black hand and pen over the black shield, and the symbols inside the shield.

• The red color of the circle symbolizes military fortitude.

• The five dates represent the times that the city’s charter was renewed.

• The hand stands for faith, sincerity, and justice.

• The pen symbolizes educated employment.

• The shield represents protection of citizens.

• The black color of the hand and shield stands for constancy.

The symbols inside the shield are a cross and crown. These symbols represent the mission that De Luna was on when he first settled in Pensacola to spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ and claim the area for the Spanish crown.

The “Pensacola” Banner: A banner with “Pensacola” is displayed across the middle of the shield. This banner symbolizes the city’s reward for its long and rich valiant service. The blue color of the banner represents loyalty and truth.

The Five Flags: Pensacola is known as “The City of Five Flags” because during its history, the city came under the rule of five governments: Spain, France, Great Britain, the Confederacy, and the United States.

The Laurel Leaves: The laurel leaves on each side of the shield under the banner stand for the peace and triumph that Pensacola enjoys in its rich heritage.

The Eagle: The eagle at the top of the badge is a symbol of power and sovereignty.

For Pensacola police officers, this symbolizes the courage and freedom for which they fight. Each officer must earn the right to wear the shield, and each one wears it proudly.

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Published by Mike Simmons

I am a retired sergeant with the Pensacola Police Department. I currently work as a coordinator at the George Stone Criminal Justice Training Center. I am married to the former Jerri Crabtree. We have three grown children and seven grandchildren. I volunteer with a boys' mentoring program known as "Royal Rangers."

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